What to do near New Orleans

Continued from previous post: What to do in New Orleans

After a few days in the city, we picked up a car and headed out of New Orleans. The first thing I insisted we do is drive across the longest bridge over water in the world: the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – at 24 miles long. Once on the bridge, it wasn’t long before we could see only road and water. The geek in me thought this was great.

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After crossing we were then on the wrong side of the lake, so we drove north, west then south and ended up all the way back around at Peavine Road. We had lunch at Frenier Landing. The deserted restaurant was decorated with creepy looking stuffed animals and had boat propellers for ceiling fans. A quick bowl of gumbo later we drove to our next stop.

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We crossed the river at the impressive Veterans Memorial Bridge and went into the Whitney Plantation for the late afternoon tour.

At the Whitney Plantation we were greeted by our guide, Ali. Ali gave a passionate and fascinating history of the slavery in the US and the work that went on at this plantation. He showed us the plantation church, the cabins, the jail, the kitchen and the ‘big house’.  The big house was large, functional, and painted to resemble marble, as was apparently high fashion at the time. The double row of trees leading from the river to the front of the house acted as an air conditioner for the house, and the floor of the ground level was tiled, to better allow floodwaters to escape. In stark contrast, the slave cabins were small, hot and sparse.

The tour was a sobering experience, and at the end, when describing how slavery was ended through the efforts of those who had nothing, Ali told us what he tells school kids that visit: “not attempting to achieve your dreams is just laziness.”

That evening we stayed at the excellent Holiday Inn Express at LaPlace, and went to the Crab Trap Restaurant for dinner where we had the obligatory boiled crawfish. We ordered about twice as much as should have, and we needed a lesson from the waitress on how to, er, deal with the crawfish. Quite a long time later, and in need of several bandages from the sharp bits of shell, we were finished. It was delicious.

The next morning, we drove the few minutes up the road to Cajun Pride Swamp Tours. We boarded the boat, and for the next two hours our guide did not draw breath as we motored through the beautiful swamp. His monologue was uninterrupted as he threw marshmallows to the crocodiles in the water and to the raccoon family on the land. The turtles were not interested in marshmallows and remained perched on their fallen logs. At one point the guide pulled out a baby crocodile from a tank hidden at the back of the boat, taped its jaw shut (“regulations”) and passed it around the 40 people on board. I got the impression it was less than impressed with the experience, but everyone on board, including us, was.

Then we disembarked, and that was the end of our trip to Louisiana. We had a fantastic time in and around New Orleans. I highly recommend you visit too!

Check out: New Orleans: food city

What to do in New Orleans

What to do in New Orleans

This was our first trip to New Orleans and during the few days we had in the city we tried to visit every single place we were recommended.

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We went across the river on the $2 ferry to Algiers. The variety of house decoration in this neighborhood was staggering: they were all colors of the rainbow, all were festooned with plants and flowers, and many had intricate woodwork. It was only after we got back we learned that Algiers has a very high crime rate.

We went up to the City Park on the tram with wooden seats and windows you could lean your whole torso out of if you chose. At the gardens, Spanish moss coated all the trees and homeless people were camped in the bushes.

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We took the tram to the Garden District and used a self-guided walking tour I found on the internet to explore the area. The tour was quite interesting but one got the impression most of the information was made up. The cemetery and the architecture in this area were fascinating. We saw beads in the trees.

We also went to the French Market for the random stalls and walked along Frenchmen Street one evening to hear loud jazz overlapping from multiple venues.

As a closet geography geek I was interested to see the city’s flood defenses up close. We found out how to get to the walkways on top of the levees (i.e. scramble up them) and saw the city and the Mississippi river from a different perspective. From here we saw houses and industry to our left, and to our right, the river and giant tanker ships. The river seemed like the focus of the city, yet somehow peripheral to it.

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Walking the streets of the French Quarter (Vieux Carré) in the relatively early morning was a contrast to the loud and crowded night-time experience. In daylight we were greeted by delivery trucks jamming the road. Men with hand carts were pushing boxes of vegetables to their destinations, and the ground was wet from owners hosing down the sidewalk from the previous night’s excess.

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The freight trains are a feature of downtown New Orleans too. We heard the horn every evening, but thought it was a ship. Then as we were heading to the Hilton’s Dragos for charbroiled oysters, and we saw a massive train trundle past.

Next post: What to do near New Orleans. We took a car to visit a plantation and a swamp.

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New Orleans: food city

New Orleans is unlike any US city I’ve ever visited. It feels European, with its narrow streets and tall balconied buildings. Mum and I were there in May and the weather absolutely perfect: sunny every day, not too hot, and mild evenings. We stayed in the Omni Royal Crescent hotel near the French Quarter, but far enough away from the noise. It was a very easy and cheap to get around on the trams, and it was, of course, very easy to find places to eat. Which brings me to the first topic of this three-part post: FOOD!

New Orleans School of Cooking

After reviewing TripAdvisor and other places, we decided that going to watch a cooking demonstration would be a Good Thing to do. So on our first morning we turned up at the New Orleans School of Cooking for their Daily Open Demonstration Class. The room was packed and the class sat with rapt attention as instructor Pat described the foundation of New Orleans, and how the coming and going of the French and the Spanish informed the cuisine that the city is famous for.

The $32.50 fee was worth it just to listen to this history lesson, but then we got to watch Pat cook four dishes: gumbo, jambalaya, bananas foster and pralines. Then we got to eat it all and wash it down with the local Abita beer. We were given the recipes, and told if we cooked one of the dishes at home we could send off for a certificate. I bought some of the local spice “Joe’s Stuff” and cooked gumbo when we got back to Pasadena – and duly received my certificate!

And the rest

After the cooking class, and based on all the recommendations we received, we had a big list of other food we needed to try, including boiled crawfish, po’boys,  grilled oysters, and of course, beignets and chicory coffee at Café Du Monde. And naturally, each evening, we had to try a new cocktail – the more imaginative name the better (Gator Juice anyone?). Brennan‘s was the stand-out place for cocktail hour, thanks to its calm back courtyard and attentive service.

Next post: What to do in New Orleans